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Graafstroom

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Graafstroom ( anhören?/i) war eine Gemeinde der niederländischen Provinz Südholland und zählte am 1. Januar 2012 laut Angabe des CBS 9795 Einwohner. Am 1. Januar 2013 ging sie in der neuen Gemeinde Molenwaard auf. Die Gesamtfläche der Gemeinde betrug zum Zeitpunkt der Auflösung 69,32 km².

In der Gemeinde liegen sieben Dörfer, nämlich:
Die etwas entlegene Gemeinde befindet sich im Polder Alblasserwaard, und wird von West nach Ost durch einen alten Kanal namens Graafstroom durchquert. Unmittelbar südwestlich des Dorfes Oud-Alblas liegen die Städte Papendrecht und Dordrecht. Mit Bahn und Bus ist eine Reise in diese Gemeinde recht beschwerlich. Der nächste Bahnhof ist in der südlichen Nachbargemeinde Sliedrecht. Von dort aus fahren nur unregelmäßig Busse. Die nächsten Autobahnanschlüsse sind die A15 Arnheim – Tiel – Dordrecht, Ausfahrt 24a Sliedrecht/Bleskensgraaf, so wie die A27 Utrecht – Breda Rucksack MCM, Ausfahrt 25 Noordeloos, und dann etwa 10 Kilometer nach Westen über die N214.
Die meisten Einwohner von Graafstroom sind Landwirte oder Pendler, die in den westlich gelegenen Ballungszentren um Rotterdam, Dordrecht usw Rucksack MCM. arbeiten. In der Gemeinde gibt es zwei Fabriken, die Käse bzw. Kunststoffartikel herstellen.
Die heutige Gemeinde Graafstroom, die auf den Wasserlauf benannt worden ist, entstand 1986 durch Gemeindefusion.
Die einzelnen Dörfer sind wesentlich älter:
All diese Dörfer haben wohl eine mehr oder weniger sehenswerte, alte Dorfkirche. Das Verkehrsamt von Dordrecht hat für diese Gegend Radwanderstrecken zusammengesetzt.
Bleskensgraaf, Mühle
Bleskensgraaf, Kirche (entlegen)
Molenaarsgraaf, das Dorf
Brandwijk, das Dorf

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Garry Shead

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Garry Shead is an Australian artist and filmmaker who won the Archibald Prize in 1992/93 with a portrait of Tom Thompson, and won the Dobell Prize in 2004 with Colloquy with John Keats.
He won the Young Contemporaries Prize in 1967 and travelled to Japan, Papua New Guinea, France, Vienna and Budapest. He returned to Australia in the 1980s. His paintings are in many galleries in Australia and overseas.
Born in Sydney, New South Wales, he studied at the National Art School in the 1960s. He was a founding member of the Ubu Films collective in the late 1960s, with whom he made numerous experimental film works, and he also worked for the ABC as an editor, cartoonist, filmmaker and scenic painter before his first major solo exhibition with Watters Gallery in Sydney

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. He was a friend of Brett Whiteley and participated in the famous Yellow House activities. He has shown in more than seventy group exhibitions and had over fifty solo exhibitions, as well as illustrating numerous books. He won the Archibald Prize in 1993 with a portrait of Tom Thompson. He also painted a portrait of Brett Whiteley’s ex-wife Wendy Whiteley for the Archibald Prize, but that entry did not win. He was a finalist in the Archibald Prize in 2009 and 2012.
He spent six months in Paris in 1973. In the 1980s he spent time in France, Spain, Italy and Holland.
During a residency at the Karolyi Foundation, in Vence in southern France he met Hungarian sculptor Judith Englert, and spent a year in Budapest with her before returning to Australia. They eventually settled in the seaside suburb of Bundeena, south of Sydney, in 1987. During the late 1980s his style (figurative, allegoric, lyric, moody) crystallized with the Bundeena paintings, the Queen series and the D. H. Lawrence series. This last is based on Lawrence’s novel Kangaroo, which was inspired by Lawrence’s stay at Thirroul, near Wollongong. Shead became interested in Lawrence after he came across letters by the author on an expedition to the Sepik Highlands in Papua New Guinea in 1968. The 21st century saw him branch out into a complex set of paintings celebrating the Ern Malley series of hoax poems. Shead is represented in the National Gallery of Australia and all state galleries, many regional galleries and numerous private and corporate collections, both nationally and internationally.

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First Battle of Homs

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Coordinates: 34°43′23″N 36°42′52″E / 34.723185°N 36.714462°E / 34.723185; 36.714462
The first Battle of Homs was fought on December 10, 1260, between the Ilkhanates of Persia and the forces of Egypt, in Syria.
After the historic Mamluk victory over the Ilkhanates at the Battle of Ain Jalut in September 1260, Hulagu Khan of the Ilkhanate had the Ayyubid Sultan of Damascus and other Ayyubid princes executed in revenge, thus effectively ending the dynasty in Syria. However

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, the defeat at Ain Jalut forced the Ilkhanate armies out of Syria and the Levant.
The main cities of Syria, Aleppo and Damascus were thus left open to Mamluk occupation. But Homs and Hama remained in the possession of minor Ayyubid princes. These princes, rather than the Mamluks of Cairo themselves, actually fought and won the First Battle of Homs.
Due to the open war between Hulagu and his cousin Berke of the Golden Horde during the civil war of the Mongol Empire, the Ilkhanate could only afford to send 6,000 troops back into Syria to retake control of the lands. This expedition was initiated by Ilkhanate generals such as Baidu who was forced to leave Gaza when the Mamluks advanced just before the battle of Ain Jalut. After quickly recapturing Aleppo, the force travelled southwards to Homs, but were decisively defeated. This ended the first campaign into Syria by the Ilkhanate, though there were several later incursions, none of which ended with conquests lasting more than a year.

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Princess Katherine of Greece and Denmark

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Princess Katherine of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Αικατερίνη; 4 May 1913 – 2 October 2007) was the third daughter and youngest child of King Constantine I of Greece and Sophia of Prussia.

Her paternal grandparents were King George I of Greece, child of King Christian IX of Denmark, and Olga Konstantinovna of Russia. Her maternal grandparents were Frederick III, German Emperor, and the Empress Victoria, the eldest child of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.
Katherine was born in the Royal Palace in Athens, a few weeks after her grandfather, King George I of Greece, was assassinated in Salonika. She had five siblings – three brothers (George, Alexander and Paul, each of whom would become King of the Hellenes) and two sisters (Helen, who married Carol II of Romania, and Irene who married Prince Aimone of Savoy, Duke of Spoleto). When she was christened, the members of the whole Greek Army and Greek Navy became her godparents. At three years of age, the princess “had to be rescued from the family’s villa, Tatoi, outside Athens, after the secret police set the house ablaze”; her mother being a sister of the Kaiser, the Greek royal family was suspected of being pro-German.
Her father abdicated in 1917, replaced as king by her brother Alexander. She and her parents were exiled to Switzerland. They were re-instated following Alexander’s death in 1920, but Constantine abdicated again in 1922. Exiled again, this time to Sicily, her father died in Palermo in 1923. The family moved to Villa Sparta in Florence, where Katherine took up painting. Her second brother George became King George II in 1922, but was deposed in 1924.
Katherine was educated in England, at a boarding school at Broadstairs and then North Foreland Lodge. Her mother died in January 1932, after which she continued to live at the Villa Sparta with her sister, Helen. She and the future Elizabeth II were bridesmaids at the wedding of her first cousin, Princess Marina, to [Prince George, [Duke of Kent]] in 1934.
Her brother George was reinstated as king in 1935, and Katherine returned to Greece with her sister, Irene. She joined the Greek Red Cross when the Second World War broke out in 1939. In 1941, after Greece had been overrun by Axis forces, she fled to South Africa with her third brother, Paul, in a Sunderland flying boat, where she worked as a nurse at a hospital in Cape Town. She heard no news of her sister Helen for four years. She returned to England in 1946, sailing the last leg from Egypt to England on the Cunard liner RMS Ascania. On board, she met Major Richard Campbell Brandram MC (5 August 1911 – 5 April 1994), an officer in the British Royal Artillery. They were engaged three weeks after they arrived in England, and married on 21 April 1947 at the Royal Palace in Athens. Her brother George died on 1 April, three weeks before the wedding, and was succeeded on the Greek throne by her third brother Paul, who acted as best man at the wedding.
She then accompanied her husband to his new army posting in Baghdad, and they later settled in England. King George VI granted her the status of a duke’s daughter in the order of precedence. She and her husband lived in Eaton Square in Belgravia, and later moved to Marlow, Buckinghamshire.
According to her obituary in The Daily Telegraph, “Lady Katherine lived quietly but remained in close touch with her own and the British royal families. She attended the Queen’s wedding to Prince Philip (her first cousin), and was a guest at the service to mark Prince Philip’s 80th birthday at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, in 2001.”
After the death of Infanta Beatriz of Spain in 2002, Katherine was the last surviving great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria, as well the last surviving grandchild of Frederick III, German Emperor and Victoria, Princess Royal. She lived for almost 87 years after the death of her brother

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, King Alexander, and her death left Count Carl Johan Bernadotte of Sweden (31 October 1916 – 5 May 2012) as Queen Victoria’s last living great-grandchild.
From the time of the death of her sister Helen, Queen Mother of Romania (Helen of Greece and Denmark) in 1982, to the time of her own death, she was Queen Victoria’s most senior female line descendant. Her death marked the end of all female-line direct descendants of Frederick III, German Emperor and Victoria, Princess Royal.
Princess Katherine of Greece and Denmark and Major Richard Campbell Andrew Brandram had one child, a son:

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Epigaea repens

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Epigaea repens – known as mayflower or trailing arbutus – is a low, spreading shrub in the Ericaceae family. It is found from Newfoundland to Florida, west to Kentucky and the Northwest Territories.

The species flowers are pink, fading to nearly white, very fragrant, about .5 inches (1.3 cm) across when expanded, few or many in clusters at ends of branches. Calyx of five dry overlapping sepals; corolla salver-shaped, the slender, hairy tube spreading into five equal lobes; 10 stamens; one pistil with a column-like style and a five-lobed stigma. Stem: Spreading over the ground (Epigaea = on the earth); woody, the leafy twigs covered with rusty hairs. Leaves: Alternate, oval, rounded at the base

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, smooth above, more or less hairy below, evergreen, weather-worn, on short, rusty, hairy petioles.
Slow growing, it prefers moist, acidic (humus-rich) soil, and shade. It is often part of the heath complex in an oak-heath forest.
Epigaea repens is the floral emblem of both Nova Scotia and Massachusetts. Digging up one in Massachusetts is punishable with a $50 fine.

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USS Benjamin Franklin (SSBN-640)

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USS Benjamin Franklin (SSBN 640), the lead ship of her class of ballistic missile submarine, was the only submarine of the United States Navy to be named for Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790), the American journalist, publisher, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, scientist, librarian, diplomat, and inventor.a

The contract to build Benjamin Franklin was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut, on 1 November 1962 and her keel was laid down there on 25 May 1963. She was launched on 5 December 1964, sponsored by Mrs. Francis L. Moseley and Mrs. Leon V. Chaplin, and commissioned on 22 October 1965, with Captain Donald M. Miller commanding the Blue Crew and Commander Ross N. Williams commanding the Gold Crew.
On 6 December 1965 the Gold Crew successfully launched a Polaris A-3 ballistic missile in close coordination with an orbital pass of the Gemini 7 astronauts Frank Borman and Jim Lovell.
Benjamin Franklin was decommissioned on 23 November 1993 and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register the same day. Her scrapping via the Nuclear-Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program in Bremerton

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, Washington, was completed on 21 August 1995.
^a Five other ships in the United States Navy have been named for Franklin.

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Hushe

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Hushe is the last village of the Ghangche District of northern Pakistan. It is the highest village in the once extremely remote and impoverished valley. Hushe men began working as cooks and porters for expeditions in the 1960s. Reinhold Messner’s cook Rozi Ali, is from Hushe. Now, the sons of these men have turned wholeheartedly to tourism and the Hushe-pa have developed an excellent reputation as guides, cooks and high-altitude porters.
Hushe villagers are environmentally conscious and work to keep their area nice. Hushe is no longer the poorest of villages, and its popularity as a trekking and climbing destination continues to grow. Abdul Karim of Hushe, famous as Little Karim, who carried 25KG of weight up to 8000m on an expedition on Gasherbrum II, is working with a Spanish team to build a new luxurious hotel in the village, overlooking mighty Masherbrum.
Climbers and trekkers that come all the way from Baltoro Glacier, Concordia (Pakistan) and K-2 via Gondogoro Pass, descend into Hushe village to reach Skardu District, which is an important town of Gilgit-Baltistan. Hushe is heaven for climbers and trekkers. Some of the world’s famous rock climbing towers are here. laila Peak

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, Amin braq ,Fida Braq and Charkusa valley are very famous.

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Mat Mladin

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Mathew “Mat” Mladin (born 10 March 1972, in Camden, New South Wales) is a retired Australian professional motorcycle racer who last raced in 2009, riding a Yoshimura Suzuki in the AMA Superbike series. He won the title seven times (no other rider has won more than four), and holds series records for wins (83, breaking Miguel Duhamel’s previous record of 27), poles (50), wins in a season (11) and poles in a season (10).

Born in Camden, a suburb of Sydney, Mladin began his professional racing career in 1992. He won the Australian Superbike Championship that year, and made his debut in the 500cc World Championship class the following year, disappointed at finishing in position thirteen and at his treatment by the Cagiva factory team.
A plane crash in 1995 nearly cost him his foot, but he returned in time to finish second in the Australian Superbike championship.
Mladin joined the AMA Superbike series in 1996, riding for Yoshimura Suzuki, and finished fourth overall. He switched to Fast By Ferracci Ducati the following year and finished third in the championship before returning to Suzuki for 1998 where he again finished third. He finally broke through to win the 1999 championship. Remaining with Suzuki as of 2007, he went on to take the title in 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, and 2005, with a second-place finish behind Ben Spies in 2006 (despite winning the final 5 races, after making some riding style changes to cope with his young team-mate). Mladin also finished runner up in the Championship to Spies again in 2007, losing by one point.
Mladin is a three-time winner of the Daytona 200 (2000, 2001, 2004). He has also made wild card appearances in Superbike World Championship races, taking pole position in the class at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in 2003.
On 20 August 2008, AMA Pro Racing issued a press release announcing the disqualification of Mladin from the previous weekend’s AMA Superbike National round at Virginia International Raceway. The press release indicated that the crankshaft from Mladin’s bike was found, after comparison with a stock “control” part kept by the AMA, to have violated Superbike class rules, which require an essentially stock crankshaft to be used. The Team Rockstar Makita Yoshimura Suzuki’s appeal of the penalty was summarily dismissed as being, “without merit,” by AMA/DMG on 5 September 2008. As a result, with only one round remaining in the championship, Ben Spies’ numerical advantage in the championship points became unassailable and Mladin lost the championship for the 3rd year in a row to Spies. It is a known that all Yoshimura bikes on that day had the same crankshaft. Mladin’s bike was the only one inspected

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. Upon his disqualification, Spies and Hayden were moved up the ladder into first and second placings, also riding illegal bikes.
On 31 July 2009, Mladin announced that he would retire from the AMA Superbike Championship at the end of the season, and the announcement came as Mladin refused to take part in that weekend’s round at Heartland Park, Kansas due to concerns over rider safety at the circuit: Mladin is known for his campaign for improved rider safety through improvements into the circuits. Mat won the 2009 AMA Superbike championship, and then retired.
He lives near Oakdale, New South Wales, with his wife and two children.
Mladin is a private individual; in 1998 he commented that “I don’t enjoy all the press side of things at all, I enjoy my racing and I enjoy winning like nothing else.”.
Mladin also lends his name to a company that imports motorcycle clothing and aftermarket accessories. As of 1 July 2009 this changed to Bike Gear Warehouse and sells online only. Despite his 1995 accident, Mat is still actively involved in his other passion, aviation.
http://www.amasuperbike.com/article.php?UID=rdH7pdq1qjs8B09D5rlQxN7KXCAoTV&sc=1120&aid=12212

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Vicente Álvarez Travieso

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Vicente Álvarez Travieso (1705–1779) was a Spanish judge and politician who served as the first alguacil mayor of San Antonio, Texas, from 1731 until his death. He was lead spokesperson of the Canary Islander settlers of San Antonio and was noted for his support for the Isleño community there. Through his demands to the leaders of New Spain, Travieso was able to improve the lives of the Isleños. He was instrumental in providing medical care for them, thus ensuring their survival. Travieso became mayor of San Antonio in 1779.

Vicente Alvarez Travieso was born in 1705 in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). He was the son of José and Catalina (Cayetano) Álvarez Travieso.
In 1730, the Spanish Crown decided to sponsor ten or eleven families from the Canary Islands to emigrate to Villa de San Fernando, (modern San Antonio, Texas) because of a supposed threat to Spanish interests by the French from Louisiana. The Travieso family was one of the families who decided to travel to the place. After leaving the port of Santa Cruz de Tenerife

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, on their way to Texas, the Canarian settlers stopped in what is now modern Mexico. While there, Travieso married his girlfriend, Mariana Curbelo, in Cuautitlan, Mexico. They were listed as the seventh family of the Canary Islanders to travel to San Fernando. After arriving in San Antonio de Béxar, on March 1731, the setters established a municipal government and Travieso was named alguacil for life. He used his new position to fight for the rights of the new Canarian settlers, becoming their leading spokesperson.
An example of this was when the Canarians had health issues and he fought for their rights to get medical assistance. On January 24, 1736, some Canarians needed medical care, but permission to travel to Saltillo, Mexico (which was the only place in continental New Spain where they could get medical help) was denied. After this, Alvarez Travieso sent a series of demands to Government of Texas, asking that they allow him to give permission to the Canarians so that they could travel to the city. These permissions were finally accepted in 1770, by the government of Ripperdá (1769–1776). This allowed the Canarians to go to El Saltillo to get the medical care they needed.
Travieso also instituted other lawsuits on behalf of his people. One of these demands (which it took place in 1740) required the use of Native Americans of the missions on the farms of the settlers as labor, and the right of the Isleños to trade their products in the presidio. However, “the missionaries appealed to the Viceroy, and they managed to retain their privileges”. Travieso sent another demand in 1756, which was directed against the monopoly and rights that the missions had on the lands and waters surrounding the villages, to which the Canarians had no access. Finally, the Isleños access to water surrounding the villages was accepted and, ironically, they became the owners of this water, preventing access to it to the Spanish Franciscans.
On the other hand, Travieso claimed to be the owner of a ranch on the banks of Cibolo Creek, the so-called Rancho de las Mulas. However, the claim was rejected by the Quereteran friars at Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción de Acuña Mission. So, he made another demand in 1771. The trial, which was developed in Mexico City, “was favorable to private stockmen” of San Antonio. However, it was not carried out, so Álvarez Travieso was still not officially recognized as owner of the Rancho de las Mulas, losing land and livestock that he had there.
Alvarez Travieso was elected mayor of San Antonio in 1776. Alvarez Travieso’s family did not continue the struggle to recover their livestock, part of which had moved away from the nearby pastures. To prevent such “excesses,” the Governor Vicencio Ripperdá issued “two trials against the stockmen of the San Antonio River valley”. Travieso Alvarez died on January 25, 1779, just after the procedure.
In 1785, the Mulas was obtained by Thomas, one of the sons of Vicente Alvarez Travieso. However, other people, who were also heirs of this land, questioned the rights of Thomas to inherit the land. In 1809, the ranch was transferred to Vicente, the son of Thomas.
Vicente Álvarez Travieso married Mariana Curbelo (a daughter of future mayor of San Antonio, Juan Curbelo ) on September 18, 1730. They had eleven children. The boat carrying the Canarians to Texas stopped in Mexico. While there, he had problems with the leader of the Canarians and future mayor of San Antonio, Juan Leal. Leal gave him a loan when they (together with other Canarian settlers) were in San Luis Potosí. Later, Leal claimed that Álvarez Travieso did not pay the loan at the agreed time. He only paid it when they arrived in Coahuila, just before reaching San Antonio. After this statement, a dispute began between Juan Leal and Alvarez Travieso. This dispute remained even after they occupied the charges of mayor and alguacil mayor respectively.

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Airco DH.9

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The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) – also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 – was a British bomber used in the First World War

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. A single-engined biplane, it was a development of Airco’s earlier, highly successful DH.4 and was ordered in very large numbers for Britain’s Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.
Its engine was unreliable, and failed to provide the expected power, giving the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it was meant to replace, and resulting in heavy losses, particularly over the Western Front. The subsequently-developed DH.9A had a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine.

The DH.9 was designed by de Havilland for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a successor to the DH.4. It used the wings and tail unit of the DH.4 but had a new fuselage. This enabled the pilot to sit closer to the gunner/observer and away from the engine and fuel tank. The other major change from the DH.4 was the choice of the promising new BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which was predicted to produce 300 hp (224 kW) and so give the new aircraft an adequate performance to match enemy fighters.
By this time, as a result of attacks by German bombers on London, the decision was made to almost double the size of the Royal Flying Corps, with most of the new squadrons planned to be equipped with bombers. Based on the performance estimates for the DH.9 (which were expected to surpass those of the DH.4), and the similarity to the DH.4, which meant that it would be easy to convert production over to the new aircraft, massive orders (4,630 aircraft) were placed.
The prototype (a converted DH.4) first flew at Hendon in July 1917. Unfortunately, the BHP engine proved unable to reliably deliver its expected power, with the engine being de-rated to 230 hp (186 kW) in order to improve reliability. This had a drastic effect on the aircraft’s performance, especially at high altitude, with it being inferior to that of the DH.4 it was supposed to replace. This meant that the DH.9 would have to fight its way through enemy fighters, which could easily catch the DH.9 where the DH.4 could avoid many of these attacks.
While attempts were made to provide the DH.9 with an adequate engine, with aircraft being fitted with the Siddeley Puma, a lightened and supposedly more powerful version of the BHP, with the Fiat A12 engine and with a 430 hp (321 kW) Napier Lion engine, these were generally unsuccessful (although the Lion engined aircraft did set a World Altitude Record of 30,500 ft (13,900 m) on 2 January 1919) and it required redesign into the DH.9A to transform the aircraft.
To boost the rate of production, quantity orders for the DH.9 were also placed with Alliance, G & J.Weir, Short Brothers, Vulcan, Waring & Gillow and National Aircraft Factories No. 1 and No. 2.
The first deliveries were made in November 1917 to 108 Squadron RFC and it first went into combat over France in March 1918 with 6 Squadron, and by July 1918 nine squadrons operational over the Western Front were using the type.
The DH.9’s performance in action over the Western Front was a disaster, with heavy losses incurred, both due to its poor performance and to engine failures, despite the prior de-rating of its engine. Between May and November 1918, two squadrons on the Western Front (Nos. 99 and 104) lost 54 shot down, and another 94 written off in accidents. Nevertheless, on 23 August 1918 a DH9 flown by Lieutenant Arthur Rowe Spurling of 49 Squadron, with his observer, Sergeant Frank Bell, single-handedly attacked thirty Fokker D.VII fighters, downing five of them.[citation needed] Captain John Stevenson Stubbs managed 11 aerial victories in a DH9, including the highly unusual feat of balloon busting with one.
The DH.9 was also more successful against the Turkish forces in the Middle East, where they faced less opposition, and it was used extensively for coastal patrols, to try to deter the operations of U-boats.
Following the end of the First World War, DH.9s operated by 47 Squadron and 221 Squadron were sent to southern Russia in 1919 in support of the White Russian Army of General Denikin during the Russian Civil War. The last combat use by the RAF was in support of the final campaign against Mohammed Abdullah Hassan (known by the British as the “Mad Mullah”) in Somalia during January—February 1920. Surprisingly, production was allowed to continue after the end of the war into 1919, with the DH.9 finally going out of service with the RAF in 1920.
Following the end of the First World War, large number of surplus DH.9s became available at low prices and the type was widely exported (including aircraft donated to Commonwealth nations as part of the Imperial Gift programme.
The South African Air Force received 48 DH.9s, and used them extensively, using them against the Rand Revolt in 1922. Several South African aircraft were re-engined with Bristol Jupiter radial engines as the M’pala, serving until 1937.
Because of the large number of surplus DH.9s available after the war many were used by air transport companies. They provided a useful load carrying capability and were cheap. Early air services between London, Paris and Amsterdam were operated by DH.9s owned by Aircraft Transport and Travel. A number of different conversions for civil use were carried out, both by Airco and its successor the de Havilland Aircraft Company and by other companies, such as the Aircraft Disposal Company. Some radial powered DH.9Js continued in use until 1936.
(Part of Imperial Gift)
Of the thousands of DH.9s built, only a few have survived to be preserved. F1258 is displayed at the Musée de l’Air et de l’Espace in Paris, with a second DH.9 being preserved at the South African National Museum of Military History, while G-EAQM, the first single-engined aircraft to fly from the United Kingdom to Australia is preserved in the Australian War Memorial at Canberra.
The remains of three DH.9s were discovered in India in 2000, one of which is displayed at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, and another in the process of being restored to flying condition.
Data from The British Bomber since 1914
General characteristics
Performance
Armament

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